Our team

Bowel Cancer New Zealand is a nationwide, patient-led organisation committed to reducing the impact of bowel cancer on our community through awareness, education, support and research.

Background to Bowel Cancer New Zealand

The charity was founded in 2010 by a group of people affected by bowel cancer, with the support of clinicians committed to improving bowel cancer awareness among the general public and health professionals. The charity aims to provide clear and up-to-date information about: the disease, symptoms, what to do if diagnosed, and treatments.

We encourage people to communicate frankly about all aspects of this disease, and not to be embarrassed to talk about bottoms and bowels!

Bowel Cancer is New Zealand’s cancer. Instead of leading the world in terms of the numbers of people affected by bowel cancer and deaths from bowel cancer, we need to lead the world in terms of finding solutions to this disease and improving outcomes for patients.

We are a (growing) group of volunteers dedicated to helping to fight bowel cancer in New Zealand. We welcome expressions of interest from people wanting to contribute to the group’s mission and activities. Contributions could include time and enthusiasm, monetary donations – or both.

Don’t hesitate to contact us via our email address: info@beatbowelcancer.org.nz.

BCNZ Strategic Plan 2017-2019

Executive Members

The following committee was elected October 2017

Garath Roberts

Chairperson

Peter Krijger

Deputy Chairperson

Trisha Cooney

Secretary

Kevin Jones

Treasurer

Sarah Derrett

Rachel Holdaway

Stefan Corbett

Rachel Afeaki Taumoepeau

Rebekah Heal

General Manager

Kimberly Tall

Administrator/volunteers coordinator

Mary Bradley

Communications and Funding Manager

Our Medical Advisory Panel

Frank Frizelle

Frank Frizelle is a Professor of Colorectal Surgery at Christchurch Hospital and the Editor in Chief for the New Zealand Medical Journal.

Sue Crengle

Sue has a wealth of experience (GP, Public Health Physician, and academic focused on Māori health –  among many other things), including work with aspects of the Waitemata DHB Screening Pilot and acceptability of recruitment for Māori.